Evaluating A Quilt–Looking at the Back

It’s important to look at the whole quilt.  This lovely pink and green appliqué quilt looks like it has some fabric toning and perhaps some wear.  However, if we turn it over we can see considerable water damage and stains:

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These stains are difficult, if not impossible, to remove and will affect the quilt’s value.  Frequently, condition issues, such as staining, holes, or wear, are easier to see on the back of a quilt.

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It is also easier to see the quilting on the back of the quilt–like the concentric circles and echo lines.  We can also see the quality of the quilting stitch, especially when the backing is a solid.

Have a quilty day!!

 

Evaluating the Whole Quilt

I love to look at the front of a quilt closely–the small stitches, the seams that match, the workmanship and artistry which go into the small things.  However, if a quilt is only looked at closely the visual impact of the quilt is not truly seen.s-l500 (2)

The pictures above are close-ups of a blue and white quilt.  The block above is called Fly Foot.  It looks fairly simple to construct–a half square triangle pinwheel and some bars.  Blue and white is one of the most popular color combinations in quilts.  From the closeup photos of this quilt it could be difficult to date–indigo solids have been produced for centuries.  Now look below at the whole quilt:

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Wow!  No longer is it just another blue and white quilt.  The movement and pattern of the blue lines give the quilt energy and make the eye move around the quilt.  So many blue and white quilts are tranquil and serene–not this one!!

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On the Longarm–Rail Fence

The rail fence block design is one of the first blocks many quilters learn to sew.  It is easy to cut (all of the pieces are the same), easy to sew (no matching corners or tricky bias edges) and it looks great!  I love the way that the quilter has arranged the blocks to look like a basket weave.  I love to help quilters finish their quilts.  I chose an allover (edge to edged) design with leaves and swirls which echoed the fabric design and gave the impression of vines growing on the fence.

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John Hewson, Calico Printer, Revolutionary Soldier

John Hewson was one of the early calico printers in America.  He learned the craft of wood block printing while working at Bromley Hall near London.  Benjamin Franklin, while in London acting as an agent for the colonies, met John Hewson and was asked by Hewson’s family to take him to the new world.  According to his daughter, Sarah Alcock, John Hewson had did not believe in the divine right of kings, which could have made life difficult for him in England.  In 1773, he immigrated to Philadelphia with his family and some smuggled printing equipment.  At the time it was illegal to take printing equipment out of England.  He set up a calico printing factory in 1774 and began printing high quality and well sought after textiles.

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He is well known for his wood block printed vases.  This style of printing uses a carved wood block to apply dye or mordant to a fabric.  Then the fabric is dyed, typically with madder or indigo.  Additional detail is added to the fabric by hand brushing (a technique known as ‘penciling’) dyes (or mordants).   The resulting textile is beautifully detailed and was prized by colonials.  Among his customers were George and Martha Washington.

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John Hewson joined the 1st Republican Grenadiers in 1775 and when the group disbanded, organized his own militia.  When the British captured Philadelphia in 1777, Hewson was forced to flee with his household, and some of his printing equipment.  The British ransacked and destroyed much of his factory.    Hewson was captured by the British in New Jersey and spent some time in jail until he escaped to rejoin the cause.  After the war he rebuilt his factory and it remained in business until about 1820.

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The printed calicoes or ‘chintz’ were often reclaimed after being used in dresses and petticoats.  The dress below is a 1780 fashion with an Indian chintz from the Coromandel coast.

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A quilt’s center medallion was made from a whole design or motifs from the chintz were placed using appliqué onto a background, a technique known as ‘broderie perse.’   In many of these quilts from the late 18th and early 19th century motifs from the chintz which forms the center medallion are repeated in the outer borders.

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References:

http://quilt1812warandpiecing.blogspot.com/search?q=john+hewson

http://kennethwmilano.com/page/Encyclopaedia/KensingtonPortraitsBiographies/KensingtonBiographies/JohnHewson/tabid/171/Default.aspx

http://www.philamuseum.org/collections/permanent/108224.html

http://vfparkalliance.org/documents/british-campaign-for-philadelphia.pdf

http://americanart.si.edu/collections/search/artwork/?id=36857

http://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O88601/dress-unknown/

 

 

Puffs, Yo Yo’s, Rosettes

I had a wonderful yo yo growing up and loved doing tricks with it.  Did you know that there are pictures of yo yo’s on a Greek vase from 500 b.c.e.?  In 1928 the Yo Yo Manufacturing company was founded by a Filipino immigrant to the United States.  He made several key improvements to the toy which made performing tricks like “walking the dog” possible.

131a14637587b7350029dde53a1a53fc--fashion-vintage-vintage-clothingThe origin of the yo yo comforter is found in the rosettes men and women of fashion wore to decorate clothing in the 17th and 19th centuries.  At some point during that time period they were also renamed Suffolk Puffs, apparently because the frugal people of Suffolk, England would reuse scraps of fabric to make them, sometimes stuffing the gathered fabric circles with wool.  Yo yo quilts became very popular during the 1930s, I’m assuming that the name changed in the U.S. due to the popularity of the circular toy.  A quick search of the Quilt Index found that nearly three quarters of the yo yo comforter’s documented were dated around 1930.

A yo yo spread/comforter is not a true quilt.  It is made of circular pieces of fabric gathered to make a rosette or yo yo (or Suffolk puff, in England).  The yo yo’s are tacked together and can also be tacked to a backing fabric.  It does not have a quilt ‘sandwich’ (fabric-batting-fabric).  Yo yo’s are also used in dimensional applique.  Here are some examples from online auctions and the Quilt Index:

Yo yo’s make a great portable project, they are easy to make (especially with the plastic yo yo makers now available) and they are fun.    Although I’m not sure that I’m up to making 10,000 tiny yo yo’s for 1 comforter!!

On the Longarm–Tips for Making Flannel Quilts

The quilting group at my church received a donation of a gigantic box filled with plaid flannel triangles–all shapes, colors and designs.  We were overwhelmed.  However we started to sew the triangles into squares, trimmed them to several different uniform sizes and then sewed them together.  For some of us it was a challenge to work without a pattern, but I believe the quilts we produced will provide warmth to those who need it in during the winter months.

Here are some tips for dealing with flannel:

  1.  Clean out your machine regularly–flannel produces a lot of lint which can clog up the bobbin area.  Every time you change your bobbin, make sure to take a brush to clean out the bobbin case  according to your machine’s owner’s manual.
  2. If possible, pre-wash flannel.  Doing so will help make it less stretch-y, it will reduce lint, and there will be less fraying (because the fibers have shrunk).
  3. Flannel frays badly.  You might want to use a slightly larger seam allowance or finish the fabric edges with a stay stitch.  Before sending the quilt to your long arm quilter, stay stitch around the outer edge.
  4. Choose a design which is easy to sew–squares and rectangles are easiest.  Bias edges on pieces like the triangles are more challenging because they stretch.  Trimming to a uniform size after sewing ensures that blocks can be sewn together accurately.
  5. Blocks with lots of seam intersections should be avoided.  Flannel is thicker than quilting cotton, so it is more difficult to avoid bulky seam intersections.  Consider pressing seams open.  Quilting through bulky seam intersections threw the timing of my long arm off and resulted in several days of frustration as I readjusted it.  I am now well versed in the art of adjusting my needle bar height.
  6. Because flannel frays and stretches, allow extra border width so that the quilt can be trimmed square after quilting.

Although flannel can be challenging to work with, don’t despair.  Nothing feels better than a flannel quilt and a cup of hot chocolate on a day when the high temperature is -40°.  It’s hard to imagine in July, but we  know that ‘winter is coming.’

Have a quilty day!!